Irreducible Rascals II

Everyone would profit — and have more fun — if we would admit and accept we are all, deep down, nothing but little rascals.

Soul Journey

“When I was a graduate student in Germany – this was in 1928-1929 – I discovered the works of Freud and Jung, which opened up a psychological dimension to the field of mythology. … Jung became more and more eloquent to me. I think the longer you live, the more Jung can say to you. … Jung gives us clues as to how to let the myth talk to us in its own terms, without putting a formula on it. … [In 1953] Jean and I had tea with Jung and his wife at Bollingen … He was a very big man, and my wife tells me that his eyes were very attractive.”

Joseph Campbell in An Open Life

The second person who has had a deep influence on my life is the mythologist Joseph Campbell. He was a rascal in the way he used myths to get us to…

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Irreducible Rascality

Everyone would profit — and have more fun — if we would admit and accept we are all, deep down, nothing but little rascals.

Soul Journey

“I had a long talk with him back in 1958 … and there was a sort of twinkle in Jung’s eye that gave me the impression that he knew himself to be just as much a villain as everybody else … It showed that he knew and recognized what I sometimes call,  “The Irreducible Element of Rascality” in himself.”

Alan Watts (1961)

I am going to wander from the central theme of this blog on Jungian psychology. I want to reflect on certain people who had a major influence on me. These people influenced how I view my world and provided me with a certain direction on this journey called life. I note that these are people who I never personally met. I know them only through their words and their (auto)biographies. Looking back, I realize I could have met a number of these people had I been brave enough…

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how ma’habocath solves problems, mostly

Of the out-of-nowhere “I feel like crap / I am crabby / bad thoughts won’t go away” problems, this one typically goes through:

  1. Eat something small, wait at least 5 minutes.
    1. At home, this is usually a small bowl of oats, peanut butter, and milk. Or something more protein-ey if it’s been a few hours since last high-protein meal, like eggs.
    2. At work, this is usually a cup of skim milk and/or a few bites of homemade bread or protein bar I always keep in a plastic baggie in my pockets.
    3. 90% of the time, problem is solved. If not, goto 2.
  2. Use one or more of many “anti-anxiety/depression” techniques. Examples:
    1. Think happy thoughts: about movies/shows/music I like and so on. If need be, fantasize about cute girls.
    2. Write down whatever is on my mind; may or may not crop up as future blog post.
    3. If at work, rely on the healing power of small-talk. Especially light-hearted jesting. Doubly-especially if customer or coworker is cute; this ma’hab finds works very well.
    4. 95% of the time, problem is solved. If not, goto 3.
  3. Eat something more, and a lot of it. Wait at least 5 minutes.
    1. If problem is still not solved, uh oh. At this point it is time for more “direct” intervention of serious issue, depending on its nature.